Alpha 3 celebrate the International Day of Forests in Ihanu

21st March 2017

International Day of Forests

We (Alpha 3) have been busy during phase 2 of the 17D expedition in Ihanu continuing with the tubing and transplanting of the seedlings at the tree nursery alongside raising awareness of sustainable natural resource management in the village. Most recently to celebrate the International Day of Forests we held an Action Day where we invited all of the villagers to come along and take part in activities and games that we had prepared.

Kelvin and Raymond explaining rocket stoves at the Action Day
Kelvin and Raymond explaining rocket stoves at the Action Day

Keeping with the forests and energy theme we conducted demonstrations on how to build a rocket stove. A rocket stove simply refers to a cooking stove which uses a small amount of fire wood. The stoves are environmental friendly because they use significantly less wood in cooking and have the benefit of being faster than normal local cooking stoves used in the community. Materials you need to build a rocket stove include:

  • Cow Poo: part of the cement, which reduces the possibility of cracking when the stove dries and is the cheapest way of doing so
  • Mud Bricks
  • Ashes: also forms part of the cement for the construction
  • Water: for mixing sand/clay, cow poo and ash

The building of rocket stoves aims to reduce wood consumption per household by half and minimise the level of smoke in the kitchen and overall cooking time. It is a simple and cheap way of installing environmentally friendly energy into the homes of rural villages across Tanzania. In order to make the rocket stove stable, you need 2 to 3 layers of bricks for the small stoves and up to six layers for the larger ones.

Kelvin, Elvis and Eleanor shaking hands with a villager after helping to build a rocket stove
Kelvin, Elvis and Eleanor shaking hands with a villager after helping to build a rocket stove in her home

As stated by the UN, forests cover one third of the Earth’s land mass, performing vital functions around the world. Around 1.6 billion people – including more than 2,000 indigenous cultures – depend on forests for their livelihoods, medicines, fuel, food and shelter. By working with communities raising awareness and encouraging the sustainable use of forests we can help meet several of the Global Goals; to ensure access to affordable, reliable and sustainable energy, action against climate change and combat deforestation. Also by increasing the areas of sustainable household and community woodlots and the use of clean and efficient wood stoves, people will have more access to cheap, reliable and renewable energy.


Climate and Conservation Tanzania