Ensuring availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all/ Asegurando la disponibilidad y manejo sostenible de agua y saneamiento para todos

5th March 2015

C8.2.1

 

In indigenous Mesoamerican culture, it was believed that water (known as Atl) was a sacred and precious resource. It was considered one of the sisters of the corn men (human beings) who together with the mountains and air, formed part of the Hajaú (the spirit that resides in everything). People used water to clean themselves, both physically and spiritually, and the use of contaminated water resulted in a contaminated self. Maintaining clean water was, on many levels, an essential part of life. Unfortunately, the pressures of contemporary life – population growth, industrialisation and agricultural intensification - have led to widespread contamination of water sources.

En la cultura indígena mesoamericana, se creía que el agua (conocida como Atl) era un recurso precioso y sagrado. Era considerada una de las hermanas del hombre de maíz (seres humanos) quienes junto con las montañas y el aire, formaban parte de Hajaú (el gran espíritu que forma parte de todo). Las personas usaban agua para limpiarse, tanto física como espiritualmente, y el uso de agua contaminada resultaba en contaminarse a sí mismo. Mantener el agua limpia, era en muchos niveles, parte esencial de la vida. Desafortunadamente, hoy en día, las presiones de la vida actual – crecimiento de la población, industrialización e intensificación de la agricultura – llevaron a la contaminación de las fuentes de agua.

-----

In indigenous Mesoamerican culture, it was believed that water (known as Atl) was a sacred and precious resource. It was considered one of the sisters of the corn men (human beings) who together with the mountains and air, formed part of the Hajaú (the spirit that resides in everything). People used water to clean themselves, both physically and spiritually, and the use of contaminated water resulted in a contaminated self. Maintaining clean water was, on many levels, an essential part of life. Unfortunately, the pressures of contemporary life – population growth, industrialisation and agricultural intensification - have led to widespread contamination of water sources. However, CAPS (Committees for Potable Water and Sanitation) are helping ensure the availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all. This is in line with the 6th Sustainable Development Goal, set to follow the Millennium Development Goals from 2015 to 2030, as devised by the United Nations.

CAPS is a governmental initiative intended to encourage communities to unite, organise, take responsibility and find solutions to water availability and contamination issues. Committees aim to involve all community members, in the process drawing on a wide base of expertise and opinion. In Las Cruces, the community in the north of Nicaragua where Charlie 8 is based, the CAPS committee has been active for 5 months since its formation at a community meeting, with its members chosen after elections held at that event. They then received training in water resource management, project administration, and water law from INPRHU (Institute for Human Promotion) and the local municipality, to ensure that they would have the tools to fulfil their responsibilities.

C8.2.1

Las Cruces has seen its population grow and, in the process, has suffered from an overexploitation and mismanagement of natural resources. A reliance on agriculture has resulted in widespread deforestation, which may be a cause of the drying up of the lagoon and river in the village.  The population realises that water is a precious resource but in the past they have neither had the know-how nor means to manage their use of it. The entire population relies on 5 communal wells. However, there are fears that continued mismanagement will result in high levels of groundwater contamination. It is hoped that through community organisation, and the support of CAPS, these fears will not be realised.

In November 2014 the Las Cruces committee worked with Raleigh to fix two wells requiring repair and, in January 2015, they carried out the restoration of a well that had been out of action for seven years. Both these projects have had a marked impact in the community, relieving pressure on those wells which the majority of the community had previously had to rely on, and assuring greater access to safe water.

The committee has worked with Raleigh on reforestation programmes around wells and hopes to continue these projects in the future. Reforestation is important because it increases the ability of water to filter down through the soil into underground reserves. This avoids soil erosion (from surface runoff), raises water levels in wells, and in the process ensures that the population enjoys continued access to water.

C8.2.5 

Elsewhere, CAPS leader Manuel Zelaya tells us that they are currently searching for alternative solutions to tackling the problem of organic waste, such as food, animal faeces and debris. They are also interested in creating workshops and raising awareness within the community about the use and benefits of compost heaps. This will reduce the widespread burning of waste in the community and provide an organic alternative to chemical fertilisers. The installation of latrines (and hopefully eco-latrines – the next joint venture planned by Raleigh and the Community) has helped contain human waste, thus reducing leaching and the contamination of groundwater. Inorganic waste is more difficult to dispose of and, in conjunction with local non-profit organisations and Charlie 8, the CAPS committee is currently working to find a sustainable solution to waste removal from the community.

All of these projects are achieving success in the short-term, but their sustainability must be ensured so that they remain effective for decades, not months. Improving the availability of water, mitigating against the effects of certain daily practices, and developing infrastructure related to health, are objectives that can only be achieved over the long-term once awareness has been raised throughout the community. Having achieved community organisation, for their part CAPS ensures that knowledge and responsibility is shared, and as such, vital steps are being taken to guarantee access and the sustainable management of water and health for the near future.

In indigenous culture, Atl is represented as a winged snake curled into the shape of a spiral. With these wings it is able to fly through the sky, drop down to the depths of the earth and move across its whole surface, changing constantly, as water does in its own cycle. However, it does not have the ability to renew itself, and so work carried out through initiatives such as CAPS makes sure that the winged snake completes its cycle and is renewed. For without this snake, and the water it represents, we will not survive.

-----

C8.2.2

En la cultura indígena mesoamericana, se creía que el agua (conocida como Atl) era un recurso precioso y sagrado. Era considerada una de las hermanas del hombre de maíz (seres humanos) quienes junto con las montañas y el aire, formaban parte de Hajaú (el gran espíritu que forma parte de todo). Las personas usaban agua para limpiarse, tanto física como espiritualmente, y el uso de agua contaminada resultaba en contaminarse a sí mismo. Mantener el agua limpia, era en mu chos niveles, parte esencial de la vida. Desafortunadamente, hoy en día, las presiones de la vida actual – crecimiento de la población, industrialización e intensificación de la agricultura – llevaron a la contaminación de las fuentes de agua. Sin embargo, los CAPS (Comités de Agua Potable y Saneamiento) están ayudando a asegurar la accesibilidad y el manejo sostenible del agua y el saneamiento para todos. Esto va de la mano con la Meta de Desarrollo Sostenible 6, creadas para dar continuidad a las Metas de Desarrollo del Milenio, del 2015 al 2030, que fueron establecidas por las Naciones Unidas.

CAPS es una iniciativa gubernamental para motivar a las comunidades a unirse, organizarse, tomar responsabilidad y encontrar soluciones para el acceso del agua y los problemas de contaminación. El comité busca involucrar a todos los miembros de la comunidad, creando en el proceso una extensa base de experiencia y opinión. En Las Cruces, una comunidad en el norte de Nicaragua donde Charlie 8 está ubicado, el comité ha estado activo por 5 meses desde su formación en una reunión comunal, que incluyo elecciones para escoger a los miembros de la comunidad. Luego ellos recibieron entrenamiento sobre manejo del agua, administración de proyectos, y leyes sobre el agua de parte de INPRHU (Instituto de Promoción Humana) y la municipalidad local, para asegurar que el comité pueda tener las herramientas para cumplir con sus responsabilidades.

C8.2.3

Las Cruces, ha visto su población crecer, y en el proceso, ha sufrido de sobreexplotación y mal manejo de los recursos naturales.  La dependencia en la agricultura ha resultado en el esparcimiento de la deforestación, una de las causas de que la laguna y rio de la villa se estén secando. La población de las cruces comprende que el agua es un recurso precioso pero en el pasado no han tenido ni el cómo-hacerlo o los medios para manejar su uso. La población completa depende de 5 pozos comunales. Sin embargo, existe el miedo de que su continuo mal manejo resulte en niveles elevados de contaminación del agua subterránea. Se espera que a través de la organización comunitaria, y el apoyo del CAPS, estos miedos no se cumplan.

En noviembre del 2014 el comité de Las Cruces trabajo con Raleigh para arreglar dos pozos que necesitaban reparación, y en enero del 2015, ellos llevaron a cabo la restauración de un pozo que había estado fuera de acción por 7 años. Ambos proyectos han tenido un impacto tangible en la comunidad, alivianando la presión de los pozos en los que la mayoría de la comunidad había estado dependiendo, y asegurando mayor acceso a agua limpia.

El comité ha trabajado con Raleigh en programas de reforestación en especial alrededor de los pozos y espera continuar con estos proyectos en el futuro. La reforestación es importante porque aumenta la habilidad del suelo para infiltrar el agua en los mantos subterráneos. Esto evita la erosión de los suelos (por el desgaste de la superficie), eleva los niveles de agua en los pozos, y en el proceso asegura que la población disfrute de acceso continuo al agua.

Por otro lado, Manuel Zelaya el líder de CAPS ha dicho que actualmente están buscando soluciones alternativas para atacar el problema de desechos orgánicos, como comida, heces de animales y basurilla. Ellos también están interesados en realizar talleres y crear conciencia en la comunidad sobre el uso y los beneficios de hacer composta. Esto reducirá las quemas de basura en la comunidad y proveerá una alternativa orgánica a los fertilizantes químicos. La instalación de letrinas (y próximamente eco-letrinas  – la nueva aventura planeada en conjunto por Raleigh y la comunidad) ha ayudado a contener los desechos humanos, y por lo tanto reducido la filtración de estas y la contaminación en el agua subterránea. Los desechos inorgánicos son más difíciles de desechar, y en conjunto con organizaciones locales y Charlie 8, CAPS está trabajando en encontrar una solución sostenible a la recolección de la basura en la comunidad.

C8.2.4

Todos estos proyectos están logrando éxitos a corto plazo, pero debe de asegurarse la sostenibilidad de los mismos para que sean efectivos por décadas, no meses. Mejorar la disponibilidad del agua, mitigar el impacto que algunas de las prácticas diarias están causando, y desarrollar infraestructura relacionada al saneamiento, son metas que sólo se obtienen a largo plazo cuando se haya concientizado a toda la comunidad. Habiendo logrado organización comunitaria, CAPS se asegura de que el conocimiento y responsabilidad se compartan, y que por lo tanto, se estén dando pasos claves para garantizar el acceso y el manejo sostenible del agua y la salud en el futuro cercano.

En la cultura indígena el Atl se representa como una serpiente con alas en forma de espiral. Con estas alas es capaz de viajar por el cielo, bajar hasta las profundidades y moverse a través de toda la Tierra, cambiando constantemente, como el agua hace en su propio ciclo. Sin embargo, no es capaz de renovarse a sí misma, y así el trabajo logrado a través de las iniciativas como las del CAPS aseguran que la serpiente con alas cumpla su ciclo y se renueve. Pues sin ella, y el agua que representa, no sobreviviremos.